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Every Moment Present is a Present

I’ve always hated the endings of things. The permanence of goodbye is terrifying, so I often choose to never say it. My stewing over the summer’s end has made me think a lot about my own mortality (in the academic sense, I’m not down that rabbit hole yet).

For the past few months, I’ve worked full-time in the admissions office – answering emails, fielding phone calls, giving tours, snapping pics and videos with social media, and getting to know the other incredible (no, really) summer coordinators. It’s been a blast!

Now, I stare at the specter of sophomore year and the life beyond it.

It’s jolting to know that I’ll never be a freshman again. Harvard’s a much smaller place than it was a year ago. Smaller and more solid. My life here seems to have crystallized – I feel like know what I’m doing here and have a sense of what I want. But once I get it?

As much as I try to live life finding thrill in the excitement of merely living, it remains tempting to stress about the details involved in doing so. What will I do? When will it end? Those questions seem especially relevant when I think about the time I’m spending here.

I’ve been having the time of my life here at Harvard and thinking about its end is at once exhilarating, terrifying, and incredibly saddening. As I wrap up my time working in the office for the summer and head into upperclassman-hood, all I hope for is a future filled with see you soon’s. I have a ways to go until I do say goodbye, to both Harvard and this life outside of the “real-world”, but I’ll spend every minute until then soaking up the now and living in the present. It’s all I have. 

About the author

Hi! My name is Julius Wade and I am a sophomore pursuing a joint concentration in History and Literature and Theater, Dance, and Media here at the College! I hibernate from 11PM until 9AM in the... View full profile

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