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Scholarships & Grants

Covering 100% of Your Demonstrated Need

Because Harvard is committed to affordability, our scholarships are designed to completely cover your demonstrated financial need. Here is our process:

  • First we determine your award by establishing your parent contribution.
  • Then we factor in student employment and any outside awards you’ve received.
  • Your remaining need will be covered by scholarship funds.

These awards come from a variety of sources, including Harvard endowment funds, gifts from alumni, general tuition revenues, and federal and state grants.

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences Scholarship program includes more than 1,500 individual endowment funds, established by generous alumni and donors, including a transformational gift from Ken Griffin ‘89. In recognition of their important legacy, we report to many of them annually using the information students share with us over the summer. When you receive scholarship assistance, you may be asked to write a thank-you note to your scholarship donor.

Federal and state grants

If you are a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, you may be eligible for a Federal Pell Grant or a Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG). Your eligibility is determined by the information you provide in your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

Pell Grants and SEOG are awarded by the federal government and administered by our office, based on financial need. Within 10 days of filing your FAFSA, you will receive a Student Aid Report indicating your eligibility for a Pell Grant. Of the roughly 6,600 current undergraduate students at Harvard College, 16% are Pell Grant recipients.

If you are a Massachusetts resident, you may also be eligible for a state Gilbert Grant, which is awarded on the basis of need. These awards do not affect your term-time work expectation.

Facts About Financial Aid

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Amount that parents making less than $65,000 are expected to contribute.

Ninety percent of American families would pay the same or less to send their children to Harvard as they would a state school.